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Warning on NAB phishing email

16 November 2018:

Watch out for this NAB Phishing email – the link goes to an excellent copy of the NAB login page.  A bank will never ask you to login via email link to do a transaction, they will always ask you to log in to your account via their website.  If you’re not sure, always check with your bank first.

Another fake Xero invoice

16 November 2018:

Here’s another version of a fraudulent ‘Xero invoice email.

Fraudulent Xero invoices are back

13 November 2018:

The fraudulent Xero invoices are back again.

Please thoroughly check any Xero Invoice emails, especially the sender’s email address, before opening your invoice.  

Malicious fake purchase order

12 November 2018:

A warning has been issued about a vicious fake purchase memo email.
If you receive an email similar to the one at right DELETE IMMEDIATELY.  The attachments contain a malicious executable file.

 

False Microsoft notification

7 November 2018:

Just a reminder that if you receive an email about your ‘Outlook Microsoft Service’ or similar, from Microsoft or Outlook, it is not genuine.  It is usually a Phishing email designed to steal your Microsoft login details!

Delete immediately.

Fraudulent invoices via email

29 October 2018:

Watch out for this fraudulent ‘Invoice’ email (or similar ones) – do not click on the ‘View’ link, it goes to a malicious website. 

 

DELETE!!!

Fake payslip notification

29 October 2018:
Here’s another email to watch out for.
Do not click on the ‘Dropbox’ link, it goes to a Word doc (with Macros) that result in a download to your computer.
Delete immediately.

Scams for 2018

The following are some of the latest email scams we've become aware of.  The list is by no means conclusive and there appears to be new ones every day.  Many seem to be coming from reputable brands such as banks, telcos and even government agencies but closer looks can reveal that the senders are not who they say they are.
Fake and scam emails can result in damage to your computer, hacking into your financial accounts, password and identity theft (among other risks).

Simple checklist when dealing with emails:

  • Do not open any attachment or click on any link unless you are absolutely sure that the email is genuine.
  • Check the sender's email address - the majority are from overseas email addresses (no au on the end)
  • If you don't know the sender or where the email is from DELETE it
  • If you know the sender but aren't sure about the content contact the person who sent it to verify it's genuine ... but not by simply replying to the email

'Mailbox error' email a scam

19 October 2018:

If you receive any emails supposedly from Microsoft or Outlook saying you have a mailbox error, your mailbox is almost full, your emails aren’t syncing or something similar,  DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS - DELETE IMMEDIATELY
They are either Phishing or malicious emails.
Pictured is just one example of what the emails may look like.

Warning to business on fake BAS statement

18 October 2018:

Businesses are being warned about false BAS Statements being circulated via email.

This is an example of the fake invoices being sent.

If you receive an invoice similar to the one below, DELETE IMMEDIATELY!

Warning on email sync advice

18 October 2018:
If you receive an email similar to the one below, DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK  DELETE IMMEDIATELY!
It is a Phishing email – the link takes you to a fraudulent Microsoft Login page. 
Microsoft will never send an email saying your mailbox isn’t syncing!

Fake court notice from AFP

13 October 2018:

Here's another scam email to watch out for – the link goes to a blank web page with a document download (Word doc with macros).
It appears to be coming from an Australian Federal Police officer, but it's not.
You would usually not receive court notices via email. 

DELETE IMMEDIATELY!

Fake AGL account

9 October 2018

With many of us being AGL customers this is one fake email to be especially vigilant about.

It could come direct to your inbox – double-check the sender’s address (on any bill or invoice) before clicking on any links.

This email is very obviously not from AGL!

New wave of dodgy invoices

9 October 2018:

Everyone is being reminded not to click on links or open emails from companies they're not expecting invoices from.

A wave of fake invoices is sweeping the internet.

A simple rule is if you're not expecting an invoice to come via email from the company that's listed then chances are it is a fake one, so delete immediately.  If someone is genuinely billing you they will chase up a debt through other means.

Credit Sense fraudulent invoice

3 October 2018:

If you receive mail outs via Mailchimp, you may have received a ‘Credit Sense Invoice’ (see example at right) – this is a Phishing email

Also, you may have received a notification from Credit Sense regarding the Phishing Scam sent out via Mailchimp.

If you are expecting a ‘Credit Sense Invoice’, check with them to see if it is genuine – otherwise delete it immediately!
Anyone who has received the email is advised to ensure they update their antivirus software and run an antivirus scan.

Porn extortion bid

26 September 2018:

Australian internet users are being targeted by a new extortion-oriented email scam.

There is an Extortion Email with the Subject: “Security Warning” doing the rounds.    They are using scare tactics to get people to pay the ‘ransom’.

If you receive a similar email and the password, they specify, is still used on any web-based platform, please change it.

The Israeli police has announced that its cyber investigators have identified a new type of ransom attack targeting online porn viewers.  The warning to the public explained that in recent weeks there have been a number of complaints about ransom demands via e-mail.  The messages said that the recipient’s computer had malware installed, which activated the camera to film when visiting a site displaying sexual content.

In order to avoid the distribution of the allegedly filmed videos to all his contacts, the recipients was required to pay a ransom in bitcoin.  The message included the recipient’s email and password to give it credibility.

However, the investigators found out that the threats were not really backed up by videos and that the email addresses and passwords were taken from old sites that contained hacked email addresses.
Pictured is an example of one of the emails.

Warning on fraudulent email

14 August 2018
If you receive an email like this one in your inbox, delete it immediately.

The link goes through to a fraudulent login page which seeks to steal important information.

At OJ Computers we take security seriously. We regularly post to the NEWS tab of our website www.ojcomputers.com.au details of the latest online scams.

SA Police warn on fake Optus email

13 August 2018:

SA Police have joined in warnings about this latest scam email which appears to come from Optus.
The following was posted by SA Police:

If you receive this scam email, delete it immediately.

Emails claiming to be from Optus are circulating. They want your credit card information for what is claimed to be an unpaid bill.
The ACMA has been receiving reports about emails with the subject line ‘We are unable to process your last payment’.
The fake emails are sophisticated and use a web address that looks like the real Optus website. The email contains a link to a fake ‘pay your bill’ page, which then asks for your credit card details.
The fake email and payment form are cunningly crafted to trick people. It’s important you check the legitimacy of email links to protect your personal information—use contact details you find through a legitimate source and not those contained in the suspicious message.

Warning on Officeworks email

1 August 2018:

The “Officeworks Invoice” email is back. 

If you receive an Officeworks invoice notification that looks like this – DELETE it!  The link takes you to a malicious website called ‘officeworksltd.com’.

The genuine Officeworks invoice is a .pdf attachment from officeworks.com.au – the email does not contain any links.

Note the sender’s email address.

Here's some tips when dealing with emails, particularly those with links or attachments:

  • Check the sender’s email address – the majority are from overseas email addresses (no au on the end of the address).

  • If you don’t know the sender or where the email is from, DELETE IT or check with me.

  • If you know the sender but aren’t sure about the content of the email, contact the person who sent it to verify that it’s genuine.

  • If you’re not sure about an attachment, DO NOT OPEN IT – check with us.

  • If you’re not sure about a link in the email, DO NOT CLICK ON IT – check with us.

Don't click to restore

26 July 2018: If you've received an email like this one ... delete immediately.

The link goes to a fraudulent Microsoft login page.

It's just another example of fake emails hitting out inboxes.

Seasonair email warning

23 July 2018:
If you deal with Seasonair and have received an email similar to the one at right, please double-check before opening any attachments as it might be a fraudulent email.
The attachment in this email is a web page link not an Excel file!
It is particularly difficult to tell if it is fraudulent as it appears to be coming from a Seasonair email address.
Contact your Seasonair supplier directly by phone before doing anything with the email.

ANZ Bank scam

23 July 2018:
Here's a warning about an ANZ Bank fake email.  Do not click on any links, but delete it immediately.

Points to note about this email:-
  • Sender – not the ANZ bank
  • Subject – ‘Anz’ should be upper case
  • ‘Login here’ link – banks do not ask you to log in to your account from an email
  • Also check for incorrect spelling, grammar or punctuation
If you’re not sure about an email you receive from your bank, contact them to check.

Fraudulent Dropbox emails

21 July 2018:
The fraudulent Dropbox emails are back! 
Note the sender’s email address.
Please double-check any Dropbox emails before clicking on any links.

Warning: Fake tax refund email

18 July 2018: It’s tax time and the common scam email informing that you’re eligible for a tax refund is doing the rounds again!
Scammers have long used the promise of a tax refund to trick people into sharing their personal information or to download 
malware.
The email, which has the subject line ‘Important information regarding your account’, includes the myGov logo and claims to be from the myGov team. Instead, the email is a ‘phishing scam’ designed to steal your personal and financial information.
The email (pictured) asks you to click on a link to claim your refund. If you click the link a fake tax refund claim form will open in your browser.

 

The form asks for your name and contact details, your myGov password and your credit card number.  After you supply this information and click the ‘Continue’ button, you’ll be automatically redirected to the myGov website. By then it’s too late and the scammer has your details.

The scammers use this information to commit credit card fraud and identity theft.
If you receive an email like this one, do not click any links or open any attachments.
Remember: the ATO and myGov will NEVER send an email or SMS asking you to click on a link and provide login, personal or financial information, download a file or open an attachment.

Know the status of your tax affairs. If you are aware of the details of any debts owed, refunds due and lodgements outstanding, you are less likely to fall victim to a scam.

Medicare MyGov scam

5 July 2018:

Everyone is at risk from the latest email scam purporting to be from Medicare.

Scammers have set up a clone of the myGov website to trick you into sharing your login and bank account details.

The scam starts with a phishing email that looks like it is from Medicare, asking you to update your Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) details, so you can start receiving payments for Medicare benefits and claims.

Do not click on any links or enter any information.  If you're unsure if it's a scam simply go directly to your MyGov account via a browser (not an email) and login and check your account.

Phishing emails with fake attachments

3 July 2018:

There are some Phishing emails coming through today with a fake ‘PDF Attachment’.  Please DELETE!

It is not a PDF attachment – the link goes to a fake Office 365 Login Page.

Invoice2go warning

26 June 2018:

A warning has been issued to email users who receive an invoice or a reminder from Invoice 2 Go.

If you receive an invoice or reminder from ‘Invoice2go’, please DELETE immediately.  Note that the sender doesn’t match the name on the reminder.

For those who sometimes receive ‘Invoice2go’ invoices, please check with the company on the invoice/reminder before clicking on any links.

 

Fraudulent Origin invoice

19 June 2018:
Origin Energy customers are being urged to carefully check any emailed invoices they receive before clicking on any links or attachments.
Anyone who isn't an Origin Energy customer should simply delete any invoices they receive via email.
This example at right includes a link which goes to a malicious website.

Fake invoices continue

19 June 2018:

Fake invoices via email continue to haunt computer and phone owners.
There are a few of these fraudulent ‘Invoice’ emails around – DO NOT CLICK on the “View Invoice” link.  DELETE IMMEDIATELY

Note the Sender’s name does not match the Sender’s email address!

Fraudulent ANZ Bank email

13 June 2018:

ANZ Bank account holders are being warned about another phishing email.

If you receive something similar to this one please DELETE! 

The link takes you to a fraudulent ANZ login page.

Australia Post phishing scam email

13 June 2018:
A warning has been issued about emails appearing to come from Australia Post and relating to parcel deliveries.
If you receive an email similar to the one at right it is a Phishing email – please DELETE!  The link goes to a webpage asking for company and credit card details.
You will note the FROM address has no connection with Australia Post.

Fake ASIC renewals are back

13 June 2018:

The fraudulent ASIC Renewals are back – note the Sender’s email address.  Please delete!

Genuine ASIC renewals will include the Business name or the Person’s name, but always double-check the sender’s email address before clicking on any links.

 

8 June 2018:
Warning: Double check any invoice or remittance advice emails you're receiving before you click on anything.
The links in this example go to a fraudulent Microsoft Login page which will steal your details.

Fake infringement notice scam

31 May 2018:
Fake infringement notices are being sent via email. Do not click on the “View Infringement Notice” button.

Of particularly note is where the notice is being sent from too.

Australia Post purchase scam email

31 May 2018:
Australia Post has been the target of a scam email arriving in inboxes this week.
If you click on one of the links, it will download a malicious .zip file.
You are advised to delete it immediately.

Warning on Outlook confirmation email

26 May 2018:
Another scam has hit our email inboxes this week asking for an Outlook confirmation.

If you receive an email similar to this example DELETE immediately.

Always make sure you double-check the ‘From’ address of any suspicious email.

Beware of false invoice emails

23 May 2018:

A warning has been issued about fraudulent invoice emails.

A number of different versions have been received this week.

They come from different email addresses and are for different amounts.

Note that the sender does not match the sender’s email address. 

The “View Invoice” button goes to a malicious website at the other end of a web redirect – if you receive one, please DELETE immediately. 

A rule of thumb is if you're not expecting an invoice from the company that's listed then chances are it is a scam.

Fake NRMA Insurance email

23 May 2018:

If you're an NRMA Insurance customer be warned there's a fake email being circulated.  People who are not NRMA Insurance customers are also receiving them.

If you receive an email similar to the one at right, DELETE it immediately!  It downloads a malicious Word document.

A telltale sign is that the’ From’ email address does not match the sender’s name and, also, note the incorrect spelling of ‘hidden’.

Malicious file transfer email

23 May 2018:

A malicious email is hitting inboxes today seeking authorisation of a bank transfer.

If you receive an email similar to the one at right with an .ISO attachment – DO NOT OPEN THE ATTACHMENT, DELETE THE EMAIL IMMEDIATELY!!!
This email has potential to be malicious to your computer, including your personal information.

Telstra email a scam

14 May 2018 - With so many of us using Telstra services a potentially dangerous scam email has been hitting inboxes over the past couple of days.

If you receive it do not click an any links - DELETE it instead.

You will note the Sender address is not Telstra and there are no billing details (your name and address, etc.)

Fraudulent Office email scam

13 April 2018:

Microsoft Office is the latest target for fraud emails.

If you receive this email, DELETE it immediately.  It is a phishing email which, if you click on one of the links, will take you to a fraudulent Office login page. 
It looks identical to the real thing – BE CAREFUL!

Here's some tips when dealing with emails, particularly those with links or attachments:

  • Check the sender’s email address – the majority are from overseas email addresses (no au on the end of the address).

  • If you don’t know the sender or where the email is from, DELETE IT or check with me.

  • If you know the sender but aren’t sure about the content of the email, contact the person who sent it to verify that it’s genuine.

  • If you’re not sure about an attachment, DO NOT OPEN IT – check with us.

  • If you’re not sure about a link in the email, DO NOT CLICK ON IT – check with us.

Email scam

27 March 2018

If you receive an email similar to the one pictured, DELETE it immediately. 

It goes to a fraudulent webmail page tailored to your company.  

If you enter your login details it will steal your computer/email login Username and Password.

Here's some tips when dealing with emails, particularly those with links or attachments:

  • Check the sender’s email address – the majority are from overseas email addresses (no au on the end of the address).

  • If you don’t know the sender or where the email is from, DELETE IT or check with me.

  • If you know the sender but aren’t sure about the content of the email, contact the person who sent it to verify that it’s genuine.

  • If you’re not sure about an attachment, DO NOT OPEN IT – check with us.

  • If you’re not sure about a link in the email, DO NOT CLICK ON IT – check with us.

Fraudulent tax office refund offer

21 March 2018:

Beware of the tax office offering refunds online ... they're fake.

Here's an example of an email appearing in inboxes seeking to get banking and other information fraudulently from unsuspecting recipients.

You should always check the address of the sender and in this instance it is most unusual for the Australian Tax Office to send an email of this nature.

Do not click on any links if you receive an email like this. Instead, delete immediately.

Warning on phishing email - do not click link

Here’s another Phishing email to watch out for – this one will steal your bank account login details.  Note the sender’s email address – not the NAB!

The link goes to a fraudulent NAB login page!  DELETE the email immediately.


Scammers use fake ASIC emails


14 March 2018

The ASIC Renewal emails are back again - looks to be a Phishing email. 

Although they look suspiciously like the real thing you will note the sender’s domain name – definitely not ASIC.

Do not click on the link.  PLEASE DELETE!

Here's some tips when dealing with emails, particularly those with links or attachments:

  • Check the sender’s email address – the majority are from overseas email addresses (no au on the end of the address).

  • If you don’t know the sender or where the email is from, DELETE IT or check with me.

  • If you know the sender but aren’t sure about the content of the email, contact the person who sent it to verify that it’s genuine.

  • If you’re not sure about an attachment, DO NOT OPEN IT – check with us.

  • If you’re not sure about a link in the email, DO NOT CLICK ON IT – check with us.

 

 

 

Warning on MYOB & Xero invoices


8 March 2018

TAKE CARE WITH MYOB & XERO INVOICES:

Email users are being warned to take care when it comes to opening invoices seemingly sent via MYOB or XERO.

Please double check all emails before opening the Invoice details. 

This is a malicious email. Note the senders email address does not match the company name.

Also, check any “Xero Invoice” emails before opening the attachments or links.

If you're not expecting an invoice from the company that's named or that appears in the address line of the email then it's a sure indicator the email is a malicious one.

Warning on fake Australia Post email


27 February 2018:

There is a new malware (malicious software) scam going around, which may arrive via your inbox as a fake AUSPOST email.

Do not click on the link!      Delete the email immediately.

Please be aware that Australia Post will never ... ask you to click on an email link to print off a label to redeem your package, email or call you to ask for personal or financial information including password, credit card details or account information, [or] call or email you out of the blue to request payment.

Fraudulent MYOB invoice emails

12 February 2018:

Fraudulent and malicious emails continue streaming into our inboxes. 

Make sure you double-check any MYOB Invoice emails (example above) before clicking on the ‘View Invoice” link.   

DELETE any non-genuine emails immediately.

MALICIOUS FAKE ASIC EMAIL


1 February 2018

A warning has been issued about another fake ASIC email doing the rounds that is proving malicious. They will infect your computer if any of the links are clicked. You are advised to delete the email immediately if received.

Genuine ASIC emails will be addressed to a person or the Company.

For the latest on computer security and scams check out the NEWS tab of our website www.ojcomputers.com.au.

Here's some tips when dealing with emails, particularly those with links or attachments:

  • Check the sender’s email address – the majority are from overseas email addresses (no au on the end of the address).

  • If you don’t know the sender or where the email is from, DELETE IT or check with me.

  • If you know the sender but aren’t sure about the content of the email, contact the person who sent it to verify that it’s genuine.

  • If you’re not sure about an attachment, DO NOT OPEN IT – check with us.

  • If you’re not sure about a link in the email, DO NOT CLICK ON IT – check with us.

 

SCAMS FROM 2017